The International Enforcement Law Reporter

The International Enforcement Law Reporter is a monthly print and online journal covering news and trends in international enforcement law.

Since September 1985, the International Enforcement Law Reporter has analyzed the premier developments in both the substantive and procedural aspects of international enforcement law. Read by practitioners, academics, and politicians, the IELR is a valuable guide to the difficult and dynamic field of international law.

Biden Administration Counters Trump Administration’s Sanctions against Houthi Rebels in Yemen

Saturday, January 30, 2021
Author: 
Miranda Bannister
Volume: 
37
Issue: 
2
Abstract: 

The Biden administration took actions on January 26, 2021 to suspend the Trump administration’s recent sanctions against the Houthi rebel group in Yemen. This decision was followed closely by the Biden administration’s pause of pending arms sales to Saudi Arabia worth billions of dollars. The two actions may be early-stage indicators of President Biden’s foreign policy goals in the Gulf region and show a concern for both the humanitarian crisis in Yemen and the U.S.’s support of Saudi military operations.

U.S. Justice Department Brings Civil Forfeiture Suit Against Kleptocrats

Saturday, January 23, 2021
Author: 
Kayla DeAlto
Volume: 
37
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

On December 30, 2020 the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a civil forfeiture complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida. The DOJ is alleging that commercial real estate, located at 55 Public Square in Cleveland, Ohio, was acquired using misappropriated funds from PivatBank in Ukraine.  

French Donor Contribution to U.S. Alt-Right before Capitol Assault Shows Need to Apply Counter-terrorism Financial Enforcement Tools

Saturday, January 23, 2021
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
37
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

In December 2020, approximately one month before the assault on the U.S. capitol, Laurent B., a French national, transferred the equivalent of € 400,000 to alt-right groups in the United States, illustrating the transnational component of U.S. domestic terrorism.[1]



[1]    Damien Leloup, The mysterious gifts of a French computer scientist to American neo-Nazis (Les mystérieux dons d’un informaticien français à des néonazis américains), Le Monde, Jan. 15, 2021.

 

 

Mexico Exonerates Ex-Defense Chief and Enacts Law Pausing Enforcement Cooperation with the U.S.

Saturday, January 23, 2021
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
37
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

On November 20, 2021, the Mexican government exonerated its former defense secretary Salvador Cienfuegos of United States corruption charges after enacting legislation pausing law enforcement cooperation with the U.S.

South Korean Court Reverses 2018 Order on “Comfort Women,” Compensates 12 WWII Sex Slaves

Saturday, January 23, 2021
Author: 
Julia V. Brock
Volume: 
37
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

The Seoul Central District Court ordered Japan’s government to pay reparations to the families of 12 women forced to work as sex slaves, also called “comfort women,” during Japan’s colonization of Korea. It is estimated that tens of thousands of women, many from South Korea, were forced into sex slavery by Japanese soldiers and officials between 1910 and 1945. The court ordered the Japanese government to pay reparations worth 100 million won (roughly $91, 300 USD) each to the families of 12 women forced into sex slavery. Only five of the women are still alive today. The Seoul Central District Court called the forced sexual slavery of the women by Japan's military during the war "a crime against humanity."[1]



[1] Nuyen, Suzanne, “South Korean Court Orders Japan To Compensate 12 WWII Sex Slaves,” Jan. 8, 2021, NPR, https://www.npr.org/2021/01/08/954790836/south-korean-court-orders-japan-to-compensate-12-wwii-sex-slaves.

 

UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs Votes to Remove Cannabis from List of Schedule IV Narcotics

Thursday, January 14, 2021
Author: 
Miranda Bannister
Volume: 
37
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

On December 2, 2020, the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs voted with 27 States in favor, 25 against, and one abstaining, to remove cannabis from its list of Schedule IV narcotic drugs.  Cannabis has been listed as a Schedule IV drug for sixty years under the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961.

Trump Administration Reinstates Cuba to List of State Sponsors of Terrorism

Thursday, January 14, 2021
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
37
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

On January 11, 2021, U.S. Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo announced that the Trump Administration has designated Cuba as a State Sponsor of Terrorism “for repeatedly providing support for acts of international terrorism in granting safe harbor to terrorists.”[1]



[1]    U.S. Department of State, U.S. Announces Designation of Cuba as a State Sponsor of Terrorism, Press Statement, Jan. 11, 2021 https://www.state.gov/u-s-announces-designation-of-cuba-as-a-state-sponsor-of-terrorism/#:~:text=The%20State%20Department%20has%20designated,granting%20safe%20harbor%20to%20terrorists.

 

 

Canada Extradites Two Canadians to Face Fentanyl-Trafficking Charges in North Dakota

Wednesday, January 13, 2021
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
37
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

On January 6, 2021, two Canadian nationals arrived in North Dakota to face charges concerning the alleged trafficking of fentanyl.[1]



[1]    U.S. Department of Justice, Two Quebec Men Extradited to North Dakota from Canada as Part of ‘Operation Denial’, Press Rel., Jan. 8, 2021.

 

 

FinCEN Will Require Persons to Report Virtual Currency as Part of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts and Will Require Recordkeeping for Transfers into Crypto Wallets

Wednesday, January 13, 2021
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
37
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

FinCEN is moving rapidly for reporting crypto currency and assets in two regulatory projects. FinCEN will require reporting of virtual currency held in a foreign account. In addition, FinCEN will require reports, recordkeeping, and verification of the identity of customers in relation to transactions involving convertible virtual currency (“CVC”) or digital assets with legal tender status (“legal tender digital assets” or “LTDA”) held in unhosted wallets  or held in wallets hosted in a jurisdiction identified by FinCEN.

Deutsche Bank Settles FCPA and Commodities Fraud for Over $130 Million

Wednesday, January 13, 2021
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
37
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

On January 8, 2021, Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft (Deutsche Bank) agreed to pay more than $130 million to settle the government’s investigation into violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and a separate investigation into a commodities fraud scheme.[1]



[1]    U.S. Department of Justice, Deutsche Bank Agrees to Pay over $130 Million to Resolve Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and Fraud Case,  Press Rel. 21-23, Jan. 8, 2021.

 

 

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