The International Enforcement Law Reporter

The International Enforcement Law Reporter is a monthly print and online journal covering news and trends in international enforcement law.

Since September 1985, the International Enforcement Law Reporter has analyzed the premier developments in both the substantive and procedural aspects of international enforcement law. Read by practitioners, academics, and politicians, the IELR is a valuable guide to the difficult and dynamic field of international law.

Two Estonian Nationals to be Tried in US Over $575M Cryptocurrency Ponzi Scheme

Friday, June 14, 2024
Author: 
Austin Wahl
Volume: 
40
Issue: 
7
Abstract: 

            On November 20, 2022, Sergei Potapenko and Ivan Turõgin were arrested in Tallinn, Estonia on an indictment that alleged the two men induced hundreds of thousands of people to essentially buy stock in virtual currency that the defendants claimed to mine via their mining service, Hashflare, as well as invest in their virtual currency bank, Polybius.[1]  The pair were recently extradited to the US to face trial in the Western District of Washington, and made their initial appearance on May 30.[2]

 

UN Experts Release Reports on International Crimes Allegedly Committed by Israel and Hamas

Friday, June 14, 2024
Author: 
Michael Plachta
Volume: 
40
Issue: 
7
Abstract: 

            On June 12, 2024, the Independent International Commission of Inquiry on the Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT), including East Jerusalem and Israel submitted, pursuant to Human Rights Council resolution S-30/1, an annual report that examines violations of international human rights law (IHRL), international humanitarian law (IHL), and possible international crimes committed by all parties between October 7 and December 31, 2023.[1]

 

Kenyan Parliamentary Committee Investigates UK Soldiers for Committing Crimes Against Humanity

Friday, June 14, 2024
Author: 
Morinsola Tinubu
Volume: 
40
Issue: 
7
Abstract: 

           Between May 28 and May 30, 2024, Kenya’s Parliamentary Committee on Defense and Foreign Affairs launched an inquiry into the alleged human rights violations committed by British troops stationed in Kenya. These four hearings, including one in Nanyuki, investigated “the allegations of human rights violations, including mistreatment, torture, unlawful detention, killings,” and Kenya’s Defense Minister, Aden Duale, stated that any British soldier who has broken the law during their deployment over the years will face prosecution.[1] Throughout the week, hundreds of Kenyans gathered to hear victims present evidence and share poignant accounts of the alleged crimes committed by British soldiers.

Danish Ministry of Taxation Announces Efforts against Lawyers, Accountants, and Advisors

Friday, June 14, 2024
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
40
Issue: 
7
Abstract: 

           On June 6, 2024, the Danish Ministry of Taxation announced initiatives against lawyers, accountants, and other advisors who help gangs and organized criminals. Minister of Taxation Jeppe Bruus announced a comprehensive control effort against advisors and the acceleration of acquiring new information technology (IT) tools.

Justice Department Strengthens Efforts to Tackle Human Smuggling and Immigration-Related Offences

Friday, June 7, 2024
Author: 
Austin Wahl
Volume: 
40
Issue: 
6
Abstract: 

           On May 31, 2004, the Justice Department announced a plan to strengthen its attack on human smuggling operations and to further bolster immigration-related prosecutions.[1]  The Department’s plan is commensurate with President Biden’s recent Executive Action that aims to reduce the number of those who may earn asylum when the volume of migrants at the border is sufficiently high.  Such measures have been anticipated ever since House Republicans first declined to pass a bipartisan immigration bill and border-crossings reached record levels in December of 2023.

 

Australian Magistrate has Denied Ex-US Marine Pilot’s Bid to Block Extradition to the U.S.

Friday, June 7, 2024
Author: 
Morinsola Tinubu
Volume: 
40
Issue: 
6
Abstract: 

           On Friday, May 24, a judge in Sydney, Australia ruled that Daniel Duggan can be extradited to the U.S., rejecting the former U.S. Marines Corps pilot’s bid to block his extradition. Duggan, 55, has spent over 19 months in a maximum-security prison since he was arrested in South Wales, Australia, and is currently awaiting his extradition to the U.S. In 2022, the U.S. District Court unsealed a 2016 indictment detailing Duggan’s alleged crimes. According to the indictment, Duggan is wanted for providing training to Chinese military pilots in South Africa without an appropriate license between 2010 and 2012. If arrested, he faces more than 60 years in prison.

U.K. Denies Extradition of Brazilian Citizen Due to Human Rights Concerns

Friday, June 7, 2024
Author: 
Marco Stewart Lopez
Volume: 
40
Issue: 
6
Abstract: 

           On May 29, 2024, a landmark decision by District Judge (Magistrates’ courts) Briony Josephine Clarke revealed significant implications for international enforcement law, particularly regarding extradition practices and human rights considerations. The case involved a Brazilian national on Interpol's wanted list, whose extradition to Brazil was denied by the United Kingdom on the grounds of potential human rights violations.[1]

 

Interpol Helps Brazil and Spain Disrupt Grandoreiro Banking Trojan Operation

Friday, June 7, 2024
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
40
Issue: 
6
Abstract: 

           In January 2024, Brazilian law enforcement announced the arrest of five administrators of a Grandoreiro banking trojan operation. The Grandoreiro operation has been an important cybersecurity menace across Spanish-speaking countries since 2017.  Grandoreiro introduces its malware through phishing emails impersonating recognized organizations.[1]

 

 

Illegal Rosewood Timber Trade Fuels Insurgency in Cabo Delgado, Mozambique

Friday, June 7, 2024
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
40
Issue: 
6
Abstract: 

           On May 14, 2024, after a four-year undercover sting operation, the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) issued a report, finding that since 2017, an average of over 500,000 tons per year of timber has been exported from Mozambique to China.  The exports violate the country’s log export ban and part of the trade funds Ahlu Sunnah Wal Jamaah (ASW) insurgents[1] in Cabo Delgado, a province in the northern part of Mozambique. Once again, the EIA has done a superb job in exposing the enormous gap in lack of enforcement in the illegal timber trade.

 

Bar Webinar Focuses Attention on Environmental Crimes in West Papua

Friday, June 7, 2024
Author: 
Kaila Hall and Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
40
Issue: 
6
Abstract: 

           On May 28, 2024, the American Bar Association hosted a webinar[1] on “Addressing Gender-Based Violence and Environmental Crimes in West Papua.” This event was co-sponsored by the South Asia, Oceania, and India Committee in co-operation with the International Association of Genocide Scholars. The panel featured Szilvia Csevár, Lecturer and Researcher of Public International Law at The Hague University of Applied Sciences, as well as Fadjar Schouten-Korwa, a human rights lawyer in the Netherlands, and David Whyte, Professor of Climate Justice at Queen Mary University of London. Bruce Zagaris, Partner at Berliner Corcoran & Rowe LLP in Washington, D.C. moderated the event.

 

 

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