The International Enforcement Law Reporter

The International Enforcement Law Reporter is a monthly print and online journal covering news and trends in international enforcement law.

Since September 1985, the International Enforcement Law Reporter has analyzed the premier developments in both the substantive and procedural aspects of international enforcement law. Read by practitioners, academics, and politicians, the IELR is a valuable guide to the difficult and dynamic field of international law.

U.S. Charges S. Korean and Arrest 337 for Child Pornography through the Darknet

Sunday, October 20, 2019
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
35
Issue: 
10
Abstract: 

On October 16, 2019, the United States Justice Department (DOJ) announced the federal grand jury in the District of Columbia’s indictment of Jong Woo Son, 23, a South Korean national, for his ‘Welcome To Video’ operation, the largest child sexual exploitation market by volume of content.  The Justice Department unsealed a nine-count indictment along with a parallel civil forfeiture action.  South Korean prosecutors have already charged and convicted Son in South Korea.  He is currently in custody serving his sentence in South Korea.  The Justice Department announced that an additional 337 site users have been arrested and charged.  They reside in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Virginia, and Washington State.[1]

Two of Giuliani’s Associates Arrested on Charges of Campaign-Finance Violations

Friday, October 18, 2019
Author: 
Alexandra Haris
Volume: 
35
Issue: 
10
Abstract: 

On September 20, two of Rudy Giuliani’s associates were about to leave the U.S. with one-way tickets when they were arrested outside of the Dulles International Airport in Northern Virginia on charges of campaign-finance violations.[1] These charges accused them of funneling foreign money into U.S. elections. The timing is significant as it is known that the Soviet-born men, Igor Fruman and Lev Parnas, were linked to efforts to dig up dirt on Joe Biden and his son in Ukraine.

U.S. Indicts Turkish Bank for Multibillion-Dollar Iranian Sanctions Evasion Scheme

Thursday, October 17, 2019
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
35
Issue: 
10
Abstract: 

On October 15, 2019, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that an indictment was returned, charging Túrkiye Halk Bankasi A.S (“Halkbank”) in a six-count indictment with fraud, money laundering, and sanctions offenses concerning the bank’s participation in a multibillion-dollar scheme to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran.[1] The indictment alleges that from approximately 2012 through 2016, Halkbank was a foreign financial institution organized under the laws of and headquartered in Turkey.

British Prime Minister Demands Return of U.S. Diplomat’s Wife for Auto Collision Killing Motorcyclist

Wednesday, October 16, 2019
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
35
Issue: 
10
Abstract: 

On October 7, 2019, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson called for the wife of a United States diplomat involved in an automobile crash that killed a British teenager riding a motorcycle to return to Britain.[1] After the crash, the British police talked to 42-year-old suspect Anne Sacoolas.  At the scene of the accident, Sacoolas, whose 12-year-old son was reportedly a passenger in the SUV, was hysterical and immediately took the blame, giving all her details including her British and U.S. cellphone numbers.[2]

Council of Europe Adopts Resolution and Recommendation on the Protection of Whistle-blowers

Tuesday, October 15, 2019
Author: 
Michael Plachta
Volume: 
35
Issue: 
10
Abstract: 

At its thirtieth sitting held on October 1, 2019, the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) adopted the Resolution and Recommendation on the protection of whistle-blowers. The debate, as well as recommendation and resolution, were based on a Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights report.[1]According to the research carried out by the rapporteur, less than 20 Council of Europe Member Countries (Albania, Croatia, France, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Malta, Moldova, Netherlands, Slovakia, Sweden, and United Kingdom) have a comprehensive law protecting whistle-blowers. In the remaining EU countries, the protection granted is partial; it covers only public servants or only specific sectors (e.g., financial services) or only specific types of wrongdoings (e.g., corruption). 

EU Council Makes Progress on Various Justice and Law Enforcement Issues

Tuesday, October 15, 2019
Author: 
Michael Plachta
Volume: 
35
Issue: 
10
Abstract: 

At its 3717th meeting on October 7 and 8, 2019, the European Union’s Justice and Home Affairs Council discussed and adopted a position on a number of criminal justice, home and law enforcement issues.[1] The Council exchanged views on the topic of EU action against corruption. The overall majority of ministers supported the principle of a new comprehensive EU strategy or action plan to fight and prevent corruption both in the EU institutions and the Member States. In this respect, delegations emphasized the need to focus on areas where the EU work can bring added value and the need to look for possible synergies with existing international instruments, in order to avoid parallel actions in this field.[2]

Israel Tries To Obtain U.S. Support for Prisoner Swap of Israeli American Sentenced in Russia for Transporting Drugs for Russian Hacker

Monday, October 14, 2019
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
35
Issue: 
10
Abstract: 

The Israeli Justice Minister Amir Ohana said he hoped United States authorities would intervene on behalf of Na’ama Issachar, 26, who was sentenced to 7 and a half years in Russia after one-third of an ounce of hashish was found in her luggage when she was transiting in the Moscow airport from India to Tel Aviv on April 10.[1] Israeli President Reuven Rivlin appealed to Russian President Vladimir Putin concerning Issachar, asking that she be released from prison in Russia.[2]

U.S. Judge Orders Ex-Peru President Charged with Corruption to be Released on Bail

Sunday, October 13, 2019
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
35
Issue: 
10
Abstract: 

On October 10, 2019, United States District Judge Vince Chhabria in San Francisco said special circumstances required the release of former Peruvian President Alejandro Toledo, pending the adjudication of Peru’s extradition request concerning corruption charges.[1] Toledo, 73, has been held in solitary confinement in a county jail about 40 miles east of San Francisco since his arrest on July 15.  Judge Chhabria observed a staff psychiatrist’s report, stating solitary confinement had caused a marked decline in Toledo’s mental state.[2]

U.S. Halts U.S.-Cuba Enforcement Dialogue and Cooperation

Saturday, October 12, 2019
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
35
Issue: 
10
Abstract: 

During the last 18 months the United States government has halted the U.S.-Cuba Enforcement Dialogue and Cooperation, first allegedly due to the health problems experienced by U.S. diplomats in Cuba and then Cuban support for the Maduro administration in Venezuela. On January 16, 2017, the United States and Cuba signed a bilateral Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on Law Enforcement Cooperation.  On January 16, Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes traveled to Cuba for official meetings and witnesses the signing of the MOU.[1]

U.S.-Honduras Sign Asylum Agreement

Saturday, October 12, 2019
Abstract: 

On September 25, 2019, the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Honduras government announced an asylum agreement that will enable U.S. immigration authorities to send asylum applicants from the border to Honduras.[1]  The agreement was signed by Honduras’ minister of foreign affairs during the United Nations General Assembly in New York.[2] A joint statement announced both countries commitment to implementing the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Republic of Honduras for Cooperation in order to continue building stronger border security and law enforcement cooperation.[3]

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