The International Enforcement Law Reporter

The International Enforcement Law Reporter is a monthly print and online journal covering news and trends in international enforcement law.

Since September 1985, the International Enforcement Law Reporter has analyzed the premier developments in both the substantive and procedural aspects of international enforcement law. Read by practitioners, academics, and politicians, the IELR is a valuable guide to the difficult and dynamic field of international law.

Icelandic Seafood Company Withdraws from Namibia After Bribery Charges

Saturday, January 25, 2020
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
36
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 
On January 17, 2020, Samherji’s acting chief executive Björgólfur Jóhannsson issued a statement, confirming his company’s withdrawal from its businesses in Namibia, including a N$400 million[1] vessel it purchased with Namibians, using state-allocated fishing quotas.[2]

Former Barbados Minister and Parliamentarian Convicted of Receiving and Laundering Bribes from Barbados Insurance Company While Company Must Disgorge

Saturday, January 25, 2020
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
36
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

 On January 16, 2020, a federal jury in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York in Brooklyn found a former Minister of Industry and member of the Barbados Parliament guilty for his role in a scheme to launder bribes paid to him by executives of the Insurance Corporation of Barbados Limited (ICBL).[1]

More than 300 People Arrested in Connection with ‘Ndrangheta Mafia

Saturday, January 25, 2020
Author: 
Esther Bouquet
Volume: 
36
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

On December 19, 2019, a major mafia crackdown involving more than 3,000 Italian police officers resulted in 334 arrests across Germany, Bulgaria, Switzerland, and 12 provinces in Italy. Out of the 334 arrests, 260 suspects were jailed and 70 were placed under house arrest. In addition to the arrests, authorities seized or froze property with a value of approximately $16.7 million.[1]

U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement Increases IP and Environmental Enforcement

Saturday, January 25, 2020
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
36
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

 As the ratifications of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) continue, professionals are focusing on the enforcement cooperation improvements in intellectual property and environmental law.  On January 16, 2020, the U.S. Senate approved the agreement by a vote of 89 to 10.  The month before, the House approved the agreement by a similarly wide margin, after months of negotiations between Democrats and the White House, which produced pro-labor revisions and jettisoned drug-exclusivity provisions the pharmaceutical industry sought.[1]

NGOs Submit a Communication to the ICC Alleging Responsibility of EU Arms Companies for War Crimes in Yemen

Saturday, January 18, 2020
Author: 
Michael Plachta
Volume: 
36
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

In a historic step on December 11, 2019, the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights (ECCHR) along with its partner organizations – Mwatana for Human Rights from Yemen, the International Secretariat of Amnesty International, the Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT) based in the United Kingdom, Centre d’Estudis per la Pau J.M. Delàs (Centre Delàs) from Spain, and Osservatorio Permanente sulle Armi Leggere e le Politiche di Sicurezza e Difesa (O.P.A.L.) – submitted a communication (“the Communication”) to the Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) of the International Criminal Court (ICC) on the situation in Yemen.[1]

Sudan to Open Investigations into Crimes Committed under Omar al-Bashir

Wednesday, January 15, 2020
Author: 
Alexandra Haris
Volume: 
36
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

In late December, Sudan announced it opened an investigation into the crimes committed in Darfur by the former president Omar al-Bashir, 75, and his regime.[1] This move aims to end years of impunity and bring perpetrators to justice during a fragile political transition. A member of al-Bashir’s regime who is also being investigated is former intelligence chief Salah Gosh, who faces four cases against him.

U.S. Homeland Security Orders Mexican Asylum Seekers to Guatemala over Mexico’s Objections

Tuesday, January 14, 2020
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
36
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

On January 6, 2020, the same day the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) confirmed it plans to send some Mexican asylum seekers to Guatemala to slow or block migration to the United States, Mexico’s Secretary of Foreign Relations issued a statement saying it disagreed with the U.S.’s proposal to send as many as 900 Mexican nationals to Guatemala within the next month. [1]

France Extradites Suspected Torturer to Argentina

Monday, January 13, 2020
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
36
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

On December 15, 2019, the French government extradited Mario Sandoval to Argentina, where he is suspected of participating in around 500 crimes against humanity in the Clandestine Center of Detention, which functioned as the Navy Mechanics School (ESMA) during the dictatorship.[1] Sandoval, 66, resided in France since 1985 and fought extradition to Argentina since 2012 for the disappearance of a university student Beatriz Cantarini de Abriata.[2]

U.S. Homeland Security Orders Mexican Asylum Seekers to Guatemala over Mexico’s Objections

Friday, January 10, 2020
Author: 
Bruce Zagaris
Volume: 
36
Issue: 
1
Abstract: 

On January 6, 2020, the same day the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) confirmed it plans to send some Mexican asylum seekers to Guatemala to slow or block migration to the United States, Mexico’s Secretary of Foreign Relations issued a statement saying it disagreed with the U.S.’s proposal to send as many as 900 Mexican nationals to Guatemala within the next month. [1]

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